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China’s Plan to Impose Draconian Law on Hong Kong Sparks International Outcry

2 min read
People wearing masks in Hong Kong for COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak

People wearing masks in Hong Kong for COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak. Photo: Chinanews.com / China News Service / Youtube. CC BY 3.0.


China’s announcement it will bypass Hong Kong’s legislature to impose draconian security laws on the city to quell “subversion” and “foreign interference” during the year-long protest movement sparked criticism and concern on Friday from the U.S., U.K., and international rights organizations.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the move would be a “death knell” for the city’s promised autonomy.

“The United States condemns the People’s Republic of China (PRC) National People’s Congress proposal to unilaterally and arbitrarily impose national security legislation on Hong Kong,” Pompeo said in a statement.

“The decision to bypass Hong Kong’s well-established legislative processes and ignore the will of the people of Hong Kong would be a death knell for the high degree of autonomy Beijing promised for Hong Kong,” he said, referring to the legally binding 1984 Sino-British Joint Declaration, which the Chinese Communist Party has said is no more than a “historical document.”

“These actions push Hong Kong’s autonomy to the breaking point, violating the PRC government’s obligations under the 1984 Sino-British Joint Declaration, an international treaty,” said Rep. James McGovern and Sen. Marco Rubio, the chair and cochair of the U.S. Congressional-Executive Commission on China,

“We call on the PRC government to reverse its outrageous and unacceptable action and uphold its international obligations to protect Hong Kong’s autonomy and the rights and freedoms of Hong Kong people,” they said in a statement.

Full story: rfa.org

Reported by Chung Kuang-cheng for RFA’s Cantonese Service, and by Jia Ao for the Mandarin Service. Translated and edited by Luisetta Mudie.

Copyright © 1998-2020, RFA. Used with the permission of Radio Free Asia, 2025 M St. NW, Suite 300, Washington DC 20036.


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